pink women sustainabilityby Tracey de Morsella, Green Economy Post.  Follow Tracey on Twitter @greeneconpost.

Last year, during Women’s History Month, we published, our list of the top women in sustainability. This week, PINK released their list of the top women in sustainability for 2011.   These are women who they see as pioneers who are  employing cutting-edge best practices to lead the movement for corporate responsibility and sustainability. The list is meant to showcase the women at the helm and to encourage more organizations to tap women for these key jobs. The selection process involved reviewing the ranking of the S&P 100 based on the values of environmental responsibility, equitable treatment of employees and good governance and contributions to the community.  They evaluated the ranking of companies by Calvert Investments, a Bethesda, Md.-based firm specializing in socially responsible investment.  their newly-released analysis.

The list includes:

Click through on the links to read their profiles or read the whole post, The Top Women in Sustainability in 2011

Pink has also compiled a list of “5 Women to Watch” along with their list of the Top 10 Women in Sustainability.Pink predicts that you will be hearing a lot from these women in months and years to come.

  • Britta Gross: Director, Global Energy Systems and Infrastructure Commercialization, General Motors
  • Kathy Hopinkah Hannan: National Managing Partner, Diversity and Corporate Responsibility, KPMG LLP
  • Elizabeth Johnson: Reconnect Program Manager, Dell
  • Pat Rayl: Second Vice President of Technology Services, Aflac
  • Alison Taylor: Vice President of Sustainability – Americas, Siemens

Find out why they were chosen on Pink’s post, Five Women to Watch.

Don’t forget to check out our list of top women in sustainability in our post, Celebrating Women in Sustainability: 10 Women Making Strides in Sustainability.  You might also want to check out the rest of the post in our Women’s History Month series:

If you know of other women working to green our world that you feel should be on the list, post information about them in the comments form below.

© 2011, Tracey de Morsella. All rights reserved. Do not republish.

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Author: Tracey de Morsella (323 Articles)

Tracey de Morsella started her career working as an editor for US Technology Magazine. She used that experience to launch Delaware Valley Network, a publication for professionals in the Greater Philadelphia area. Years later, she used the contacts and resources she acquired to work in executive search specializing in technical and diversity recruitment. She has conducted recruitment training seminars for Wachovia Bank, the Department of Interior and the US Postal Service. During this time, she also created a diversity portal called The Multicultural Advantage and published the Diversity Recruitment Advertising Toolkit, a directory of recruiting resources for human resources professionals. Her career and recruitment articles have appeared in numerous publications and web portals including Woman Engineer Magazine, Monster.com, About.com Job Search Channel, Workplace Diversity Magazine, Society for Human Resource Management web site, NSBE Engineering Magazine, HR.com, and Human Resource Consultants Association Newsletter. Her work with technology professionals drew her to pursuing training and work in web development, which led to a stint at Merrill Lynch as an Intranet Manager. In March, she decided to combine her technical and career management expertise with her passion for the environment, and with her husband, launched The Green Economy Post, a blog providing green career information and covering the impact of the environment, sustainable building, cleantech and renewable energy on the US economy. Her sustainability articles have appeared on Industrial Maintenance & Plant Operation, Chem.Info,FastCompany and CleanTechies.

  • http://www.transitioningtogreen.com William Russell

    Jeana Wirtenberg, President and CEO of Transitioning to Green, Co-Founder and Senior Advisor, Institute for Sustainable Enterprise (ISE) at Fairleigh Dickinson University is my business partner and a tireless force for transitioning people and companies to become more sustainable. She specializes in bringing Organizational Design (OD) and Human Resources (HR) best practices to sustainability programs and sustainability values, principles and practices to OD/HR programs. Her work focuses on bringing people together to learn how to develop and lead thriving, sustainable enterprises that are “in and for the world.” Jeana is also the lead editor of The Sustainable Enterprise Fieldbook: When It All Comes Together published by Greenleaf Publishing/AMACOM 2008. She is a designer and lead author on the worldwide study “Creating a Sustainable Future: A Global Study of Current Trends and Possibilities 2007-2017” sponsored by the American Management Association (AMA, 2007). She is editor of “Transitioning to the Green Economy” a Special Issue of People & Strategy Journal published by Human Resource People & Strategy (HRPS) April 2010 http://www.hrps.org.

  • http://www.renassociates.com Terri McNichol

    Ditto to all of the above on Jeana Wirtenberg who I am delighted to see has been endorsed by William Russell. Jeana Wirtenberg has an extraordinary leadership quality of not just advocating for but also attracting and retaining enormous, diversified talent resources–people. Although there is not a shortage of this resource as we can see by population growth numbers globally it is probably the world’s most under-utilized resource. Jeana Wirtenberg is a visionary who sees this, understands it and has a proven track record for energizing teams to perform to their very highest potential and talent ratio. She is a highly sought out keynote at sustainability conclaves and can spark even tepid environments! Her efforts have proven time and time again that people want to get involved and contribute to the sustainability effort–they just need a guiding light. Enter Jeana Wirtenberg.

  • Duane

    Wow, these women certainly have their work cut out for them — the companies they work for some of the leaders in the race to deplete all the world’s resources.